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with civil rights activists through detroit's gross point suburb in 1963. that's 50 years ago. the editorial information on that ap photo notes romney said he had not been asked to head the parade, but added since he was in the detroit area, he decided to come out anyway. in other words, he didn't wait for an invitation. he made sure he was there. in this 1966 reelection -- his 1966 reelection for campaign for michigan governor, romney won 30% of the black vote. one generation later in the same family, mitt romney wins 6% of the african-american vote. by the way, here is a great picture. where i grew up in. jackie robinson and nelson rockefeller. he told reporters he was a rockefeller republican. you had jackie robinson, lionel hampton, all those people, famous people, wilt chamberlin, a lot of people were republicans. today you can't find them. >> a lot of our families were. i can go back in my family, especially my family in north carolina, and there were a lot of republicans. but when the party changed, you know, blacks decide we needed to go to a plays where we were welcome and where we
detroit. >> right. >> well, detroit is a great symbol of failure. anyway, thank you, glenn thrush. thanks for giving us the idea for the piece. what he is going took tomorrow about economic inequality, not just racial inequality. >>> up next, bachmann's stand. we're talking about michele bachmann. a new ebook just came out. more trouble for her. her staff is in revolt. even her own people on coming out against her on her way out. this is "hardball," the place for politics. ols... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ [ crisp crunches ] [ rumbling ] [ crisp crunches ] whoo-hoo-hoo! guess it was. [ male announcer ] pringles, bursting
, he did one in 1960 to '61. another in detroit. so he put them all together to deliver this incredible message that moved the nation and our world. >> that crescendo that came at the end, that build, the speech was kind of prosaic, then he started talking my country 'tis of thee from the song. and the references to the bible and shakespeare. "the new york times" today pointed out -- people are going to be studying this for years. the source material of the bible, of shakespeare, of woody guthrie, of the declaration and documents all enriching that one statement. in 17 minutes. >> i mean, that's the brilliance of it. that was the brilliance of who he as an orator was. and "i have a dream" is probably one of the most well-known speeches on the planet. >> around the world. >> around the world. unquestionably. and i think certainly today represented some of that. with all the coverage from rural networks. i've done so many things from bbc that i've ever done in my life. but because of the importance of this message. >> what's it like when you hear him say on tape again my four little child
happens with this class. nelson cruz of the text rangers, jhonny peralta of the detroit tigers, it will be very interesting to see if they get a bigger salary next year than they do this year. >> we've had the quiet old burning question about pete rose who played for philly for a while, he's obviously a cincinnati guy. but the old question, how do you balance out great performance against breaking the rules. where do the fans stand on that one, mark? >> well, listen, i think there are fans quite upset with alex rodriguez and this steroid era. but i go back to my previous point. i think baseball profited. home runs were up. runs per game were up. baseball somewhere? '98, the sport was rejuvenated. i think there was a time where baseball fans looked at the record books and cherished those records. unrnl to, the steroid era oh blitz rated that record book. i think more often than not a lot of people look at peds and say it's a sign of the times. there's too much money to be made. if i'm an athlete, i might look for an advantage. not saying that i would do it, but people go out and
is on the rocks. >>> we're learning about another terror plot that was foiled. what do new york city and detroit have in common? bankruptcy. all that is
that was foiled. what do new york city and detroit have in common? bankruptcy.
not include the branding of immigrants. >>> michael bloomberg is taking the lessons of detroit's bankruptcy to heart. he cautioned that new york city could suffer a similar fate if it takes the well-being for granted. it comes on the anniversary of on new york's own fiscal crisis in the '70s. here's a flashback to the last federal bailout, which was signed 35 years ago on this days in 1978. >> on the steps of city hall in new york this afternoon, president carter signed into law a bill to keep the city from going bankrupt. with this law, the federal government guarantees more than 1.5 billion of loans to the city over the next four years. the white house decided it should be done outside where itled draw a large crowd, an effort in the white house to portray firm presidential action. >>> we've come a long way. >>> up next, 13 women have now acowsed bob filner of sexual harassment. when we return, we'll meet one of his accusers. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. jackie: there are plenty of things i prefer to do on my own. but when it comes to investing, i just think it's be
in another direction. it's another step closer to making new york city like detroit. >> we've heard this kind of talk before.
generally roets republican he said yeah, and new york will end up like detroit, tax the rich and give to the poor and drive away successful industries like banking bankrupt thecity. katrina van denhooval endorsed de blasio. katrina, as an outsider to new york city, from afar it looks like you've had centrist leadership for the last couple of decades and it's served the city well. but the change is coming regardless of who wins the democratic primary presume they then win the general. >> after 12 years, this is a referendum on the city he has left behind. there are things to say -- good things to say. bill's lead today for two reasons. he is the most bold on economic and policing. you may not know millions of people don't know that half of new york lives in or near poverty. 1.5 million new yorkers go to bed every night with hunger or with hunger insecurity. i don't think it's left to say we're going to tax the wealthiest to invest in early education, to have living wage, to have affordable housing, and to have paid sick days. that is about rebuilding a new york that is healthy and for
the terrifying prospect that one result of the bankruptcy of the city of detroit could be the thousands of potential personal bankruptcies caused by the slashing of retirees' pensions. a full discussion on that is coming up. all that plus i am absolutely gein
of the bankruptcy of the city of detroit could be the thousands of potential personal bankruptcies caused by the slashing of retirees' pensions. a full discussion on that is coming up. all that plus i am absolutely geeking out a little bit over what i think is the coolest car ever. the tesla. i will tell you why it's so cool
that to cities like atlanta at 66%, detroit 62%. check out philly, my hometown, 58%. what's even more depressing is the graduation rate among african-americans who actually make it into college. according to the journal of blacks in higher education, that's blacks in higher educati that's 42% from college once you get in. a new book about the first black public high school in the u.s. tells the fascinating story of how african-american students excelled in a time they had limited resources. dunbar high school here in d.c. with me now is the author and award winning journalist allison stewart. thank you so much. you were for many years or at least for a while our colleague here. >> sure. >> let me ask you about generations and progress and your experience with your family which is, perhaps, the heart of this story. what has happened over the last several generations at dunbar? >> it's an amazing story. i remember one of the times i told you, i started working on this in 2006. i told you, chris, i'm working on a story about dunbar high school. my parents went there and my grandfather went there. y
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)